Determining simultaneously iron, zinc and cadmium isotopes in small volumes of seawater is possible now!

The first simultaneous method for the determination of these three isotope systems in seawater has been published. This method is designed for use on only a single litre of seawater representing a 1–20 fold reduction in sample size and a 4–130 decrease in blank compared to previously reported methods. The procedure yields data with high precision for all three elements, allowing estimation of natural variability in the oceans, which spans 1–3‰ for all three isotope systems. Simultaneous extraction and purification of three metals makes this method ideal for high-resolution, large-scale endeavours such as the GEOTRACES programme.

13 Conway

Figure: ‘Metal-free’ seawater doped with varying concentrations of ‘zero’ isotope standards, processed through the simultaneous method, and then analysed by double spike MC-ICPMS for Fe, Zn and Cd isotope ratios. All values were determined within 2 sigma error (error bars shown) of zero.

 

Reference:

Tim M. Conway, Angela D. Rosenberg, Jess F. Adkins, Seth G. John (2013), A new method for precise determination of iron, zinc and cadmium stable isotope ratios in seawater by double-spike mass spectrometry, Analytica Chimica Acta, Volume 793, Pages 44-52, DOI: 10.1016/j.aca.2013.07.025. Click here to access the paper.

Latest highlights

Science Highlights

Different fates of four poorly soluble trace elements in the Pacific Ocean

Zheng and co-authors present the full-depth distributions of aluminum, lead, manganese and copper in the western South Pacific.

24.11.2022

Science Highlights

Internal tides, energetic dynamical processes that generate particle nepheloids at different depths

In this study, Barbot and co-authors identified the sites where internal tides are responsible for sediment resuspension…

09.11.2022

Science Highlights

Greenland’s floating ice tongues, sources of dissolved lead to the Arctic

Using helium and neon as tracers for subglacial meltwater, Krisch and colleagues found that subglacial discharge is a source of dissolved lead.

Science Highlights

Debate on the dissolved nickel bioavailibility in surface waters

John and co-authors tackle one of the known paradoxes regarding trace metal cycles in the ocean…

08.11.2022

Rechercher