Slow-spreading ridges could be major oceanic iron contributor

A large dissolved iron- and manganese-rich plume has been detected by Saito and co-authors over the slow-spreading southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This discovery calls into question the assumption that deep-sea hydrothermal vents along slow-spreading ridges were negligible contributors to the oceanic iron inventory. This result urges reassessment and a likely increase of the contribution of hydrothermal vents to the supply of iron.

13 Saito Noble

Figure: A zonal section of dissolved iron in the South Atlantic. The higher iron concentrations (in warm colours red, orange) reveal a large plume at ∼2,900 m depth and 2 km in height.
Please click here to view the figure larger.

 

Reference:

Saito, Mak A., Abigail E. Noble, Alessandro Tagliabue, Tyler J. Goepfert, Carl H. Lamborg, William J. Jenkins (2013) Slow-spreading submarine ridges in the South Atlantic as a significant oceanic iron source Nature Geoscience 6 (9), 775-770 DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1893

Latest highlights

Science Highlights

Deep sea lithogenic weathering a source of iron colloids for the ocean

Homoky and co-workers determined the isotope composition of dissolved iron profiles in shallow surface sediments of the South Atlantic Uruguayan margin…

28.03.2021

Science Highlights

Adding external sources allow a better simulation of the oceanic rare earth elements cycles

Oka and colleagues demonstrate that the global distribution of REE can be reproduced by considering the internal cycle associated with reversible scavenging and external REEs inputs around continental regions.

26.03.2021

Science Highlights

First direct measurements of luxury iron uptake in natural phytoplankton communities: surprising results!

This study demonstrates the importance of biology and ecology to understanding iron biogeochemistry.

19.03.2021

Science Highlights

Air-sea gas disequilibrium drove deoxygenation of the deep ice-age ocean

This study provides one of the first mechanistic explanations for Last Glacial Maximum deep ocean deoxygenation.

18.03.2021

Rechercher