Slow-spreading ridges could be major oceanic iron contributor

A large dissolved iron- and manganese-rich plume has been detected by Saito and co-authors over the slow-spreading southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This discovery calls into question the assumption that deep-sea hydrothermal vents along slow-spreading ridges were negligible contributors to the oceanic iron inventory. This result urges reassessment and a likely increase of the contribution of hydrothermal vents to the supply of iron.

13 Saito Noble

Figure: A zonal section of dissolved iron in the South Atlantic. The higher iron concentrations (in warm colours red, orange) reveal a large plume at ∼2,900 m depth and 2 km in height.
Please click here to view the figure larger.

 

Reference:

Saito, Mak A., Abigail E. Noble, Alessandro Tagliabue, Tyler J. Goepfert, Carl H. Lamborg, William J. Jenkins (2013) Slow-spreading submarine ridges in the South Atlantic as a significant oceanic iron source Nature Geoscience 6 (9), 775-770 DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1893

Latest highlights

Science Highlights

The most important thorium-234 disequilibrium compilation you ever saw

Elena Ceballos-Romero and her colleagues propose a comprehensive global oceanic compilation of Thorium-234 measurements.

23.06.2022

Science Highlights

Machine learning approach led to the first iron climatology

Huang and co-workers propose the first data-driven surface-to-seafloor dissolved iron climatology.

21.06.2022

Science Highlights

Insight on the aluminium cycling during the inter-monsoon period in the Arabian Sea and Equatorial Indian Ocean

Full vertical water column profiles were established by Singh and Singh along the GI05 transect in the Indian Ocean during the fall inter-monsoon period in 2015.

Science Highlights

Distributions, boundary inputs, and scavenging processes of trace metals in the East Sea (Japan Sea)

Seo and his colleagues show pronounced atmospheric and shelf inputs of trace elements in the Japan Sea.

14.06.2022

Rechercher